Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Straws-in-the-wind, Hoops and Smoking Guns: What can Process Tracing Offer to Impact Evaluation?

Saturday, April 25th, 2015

[Spotted via  tweet by Chris Roche] Punton, M., Welle, K., 2015. Straws-in-the-wind, Hoops and Smoking Guns: What can Process Tracing Offer to Impact Evaluation? Available as pdf See also the Annex Applying Process Tracing in Five Steps, also available as pdf Abstract:  "This CDI Practice Paper by Melanie Punton and Katharina Welle explains the methodological and theoretical ...

Evidence based medicine: a movement in crisis?

Tuesday, April 21st, 2015

Greenhalgh, T., Howick, J., Maskrey, N.,Evidence based medicine: a movement in crisis? , 2014. BMJ 348 http://www.bmj.com/content/348/bmj.g3725 Available as pdf This paper popped up in a comments made on Chris Roche's posting on the From Poverty to Power website Rick Davies comment: The paper is interesting in the first instance because both the debate and ...

Process Tracing: From Metaphor to Analytic Tool

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

Bennett, A., Checkel, J. (Eds.), 2014. Process Tracing: From Metaphor to Analytic Tool. Cambridge University Press Search the contents via Google Books "This book argues that techniques falling under the label of process tracing are particularly well suited for measuring and testing hypothesized causal mechanisms. Indeed, a growing number of political scientists now invoke ...

How to interpret P values, according to xkcd :-)

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

Background:  "When you perform a hypothesis test in statistics, a p-value helps you determine the significance of your results. Hypothesis tests are used to test the validity of a claim that is made about a population. This claim that’s on trial, in essence, is called the null hypothesis....(continue here...) The xkcd view  

THE FUTURE OF EVALUATION: 10 PREDICTIONS (& you can add your votes)

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

From John Garnagi's EvalBlog post of 30 January 2015 See also the 40+ comments posted there as well As someone said, "Making predictions can be difficult, especially about the future" Give your opinions on these predictions via the online poll at the bottom of this page, and see what others think See also other ...

How Systematic Is That Systematic Review? The Case of Improving Learning Outcomes

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

(copy of a blog posting by David Evans on 2015/03/02 on the World Bank Development Impact blog) Rick Davies Comment: I have highlighted interesting bits of text in red. The conclusions, also in red, are worth noting. And...make sure you check out the great (as often)  xkcd comic at the end of ...

The Checklist: If something so simple can transform intensive care, what else can it do?

Thursday, December 25th, 2014

Fascinating article By ATUL GAWANDE in the New Yorker Magazine, Annals of Medicine DECEMBER 10, 2007 ISSUE Selected quotes: There are degrees of complexity, though, and intensive-care medicine has grown so far beyond ordinary complexity that avoiding daily mistakes is proving impossible even for our super-specialists. The I.C.U., with its spectacular successes and frequent ...

Predictive Analytics and Data Mining: Concepts and Practice with RapidMiner

Saturday, December 20th, 2014

Author(s) : Kotu & Deshpande Release Date: 05 Dec 2014 Published by Morgan Kaufmann Print Book ISBN :9780128014608 eBook ISBN :9780128016503 Pages: 446 Look inside the book here Key Features Demystifies data mining concepts with easy to understand language Shows how to get up and running fast with 20 commonly used powerful techniques for predictive ...

Anecdote Circles: Monitoring Change in Market Systems Through Storytelling

Friday, December 19th, 2014

by The SEEP Network on Dec 16, 2014  A video presentation  A pdf is also available "In this third webinar of the series, Daniel Ticehurst, of DAI, spoke about a tool/process now called Anecdote Circles. Such circles are similar to focus group interviews/discussions and beneficiary assessments of the 1980's: they create ...

DIGITAL HUMANITARIANS: How Big Data is Changing the Face of Humanitarian Response

Friday, December 19th, 2014

By Patrick, Meier, Francis & Taylor Press, January 15, 2015 See: http://digital-humanitarians.com/ "The overflow of information generated during disasters can be as paralyzing to humanitarian response as the lack of information. This flash flood of information is often referred to as Big Data, or Big Crisis Data. Making sense of Big Crisis Data is ...