Fact Checking websites serving as public evidence-monitoring services: Some sources

Posted on 2 March, 2017 – 7:42 AM

These services seem to be getting more attention lately, so I thought it would be worthwhile compiling a list of some of the kinds of fact checking websites that exist, and how they work.

Fact checkers have the potential to influence policies at all stages of the policy development and implementation process, not by promoting particular policy positions based on evidence, but by policing the boundaries of what should be considered as acceptable as factual evidence. They are responsive rather than pro-active.

International

American websites

  • Politifact– PolitiFact is a fact-checking website that rates the accuracy of claims by elected officials and others who speak up in American politics.
  • Fact Check–They monitor the factual accuracy of what is said by major U.S. political players in the form of TV ads, debates, speeches, interviews and news releases.
  • Media Bias / Fact Check…claims to be ” the most comprehensive media bias resource on the internet”, but content is mainly American

Australia

United Kingdom

Discussions of the role of fact checkers

A related item, just seen…

  • This site is “taking the edge off rant mode” by making readers pass a factual knowldge quiz before commenting. ““If everyone can agree that this is what the article says, then they have a much better basis for commenting on it.”

Update 20/03/2017: Read Tim Harford’s blog posting on The Problem With Facts (pdf copy here), and communication value of eliciting curiosity

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
Print This Post Print This Post

Post a Comment